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Is Saba accredited in 50 states?

Thread: Is Saba accredited in 50 states?

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  1. Freeky Zeeky said:

    Is Saba accredited in 50 states?

    Is Saba accredited in 50 states?
     
  2. scoobz1981 said:

    Yes

    Technically: YES.

    Do we actually have people licensed in all 50? I don't know the answer to that, and since we just got california 3 months ago I would say no - although you could just call Gardner office and ask them if we have licensed physicians in all 50 states. I do know that although we cant do clinicals in Texas for example, we can get licensed there!!! And that is one of the harder states - same applies to New Jersey. The only state I would question about licensure is Pennsylvania (I think its that one - I'm having a mental block right now) cause they are weird, the rest I would say yes for sure.


    Val
     
  3. wolfvgang22 said:

    clarification

    Val is correct.

    The word accredited probably isn't the correct word. State licensure boards do not accredit schools at all. They do approve schools for licensure. Saba is approved for licensure by some state medical licensure boards (NY and CA, to name two). Approved for licensure usually means that the state accepts your school as equivalent to their state med schools.

    In other states, Saba is simply absent from the list of schools banned by the state. This makes Saba students eligible for licensure on a case by case basis in states that do not have Saba on an "approved schools" list.

    I think the toughest state regarding licensure rules is Texas, and they are tough chiefly because they require all ACGME green book clincal rotations on the transcript of an MD applying for licensure. Additionally, they require both neurology and family practice clinical rotations. Third, students may not do clinicals in Texas unless enrolled at a Texas state medical school as a visiting student (this is hard to do; you may as well get admitted as a regular student, I think).

    I think it is Indiana that requires that a school be in operation for 15 years before their students can be licensed?
    CO is like Texas in that they have had an anti-IMG attitude in the last several years. You'll find that a few states like CO, TX, PA and some others have language in their rules making the state medical board able to reject anyone they darn well please ( until challenged in court) based on various specious (in my view) arguments. OK had such language, and it was struck down in the state supreme court. So they go back and tweak things to let in who they want and keep out the riff-raff, in the name of protecting the public. (Which they do a decent job of, just often overzealously in my view as an international med student.)

    Louisiana and Maryland are two of the easier states to get licensed in, I believe IMGS can get licensed in those states with less than 3 years of residency. CA was tough, but not anymore for Saba (except you have to verify every single clinical in writing on a form for them, I believe.)

    Your best bet is to go to the website of each state board that you are interested in and read their rules several times and figure out if Saba meets their criteria or not. My strategy is to attempt to meet Texas' tough licensure rules, using them as a guideline to simplify my life. This way, I will likely be eligible for licensure in most other states.
    Saba University School of Medicine, Class of 2009
    Diplomate, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
     
  4. krust3 said:

    aloha

    even hawaii?
     
  5. ed gee said:

    not Indiana

    Kansas has the 15 year rule.
     
  6. wolfvgang22 said:

    hawaii

    Thanks ed gee!

    About Hawaii:
    Check it out. http://www.hawaii.gov/dcca/areas/pvl...statute_rules/
    Hawaii only requires 2 years of residency for IMGs. Looks like a pretty easy going state to me, their rules are considerably shorter than Texas'!
    On the other hand, I would suspect that competition for jobs in Hawaii is fierce.
    Saba University School of Medicine, Class of 2009
    Diplomate, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
     
  7. Fornis J. Plebney said:

    Re: not Indiana

    Quote Originally Posted by ed gee
    Kansas has the 15 year rule.
    I'd think Kansas' 15 year rule is no longer applicable since Saba was chartered in 1989.
    http://www.saba.edu/home_history.php

    http://www.ksbha.org/statutes/haact.html#2802

    65-2873. License to practice healing arts by examination; prerequisites; postgraduate study; use of title and degree. (a) Each applicant for a license by examination to practice any branch of the healing arts in this state shall:
    (1) Present to the board evidence of proficiency in the basic sciences issued by the national board of medical examiners, the board of examiners of osteopathic physicians and surgeons or the national board of chiropractic examiners or such other examining body as may be approved by the board or in lieu thereof pass such examination as the board may require in the basic science subjects;
    (2) present proof that the applicant is a graduate of an accredited healing arts school or college; and
    (3) pass an examination prescribed and conducted by the board covering the subjects incident to the practice of the branch of healing art for which the applicant applies.
    (b) Any person seeking a license to practice medicine and surgery shall present proof that such person has completed acceptable postgraduate study as may be required by the board by regulations.
    (c) The board may authorize an applicant who does not meet the requirements of paragraph (2) of subsection (a) to take the examination for licensure if the applicant:
    (1) Has completed three years of postgraduate training as approved by the board;
    (2) is a graduate of a school which has been in operation for not less than 15 years and the graduates of which have been licensed in another state or states which has standards similar to Kansas; and
    (3) meets all other requirements for taking the examination for licensure of the Kansas healing arts act.
    (d) In addition to the examination required under paragraph (3) of subsection (a), if the applicant is a foreign medical graduate the applicant shall pass an examination given by the educational commission for foreign medical graduates.

    (e) No person licensed to practice and actively engaged in the practice of the healing arts shall attach to such person's name any title, or any word or abbreviation indicating that such person is a doctor of any branch of the healing arts other than the branch of the healing arts in which such person holds a license but shall attach to such person's name the degree or degrees to which such person is entitled by reason of such person's diploma.
    History: L. 1957, ch. 343, 73; L. 1969, ch. 299, 16; L. 1976, ch. 273, 34; L. 1985, ch. 216, 2; July 1.
     
  8. gypsyfey said:

    alaska

    i believe that alaska also has easier lisc and res rules, someone back me up please, as all of my search engines are malfunctioning tonight
     
  9. scoobz1981 said:

    Alaska

    Sandy from the clinical department sent out an email about a week ago to all clinical students about doing clinical rotations in Alaska... So if anyone is interested (they have amazing heli-skiing there) then I suggest going. I am considering it myself - more so for the skiing... lol... but I am sure the hospitals in Anchorage are good too!


    Val
    P.S. If you want a copy of the email, just PM me
     
  10. wolfvgang22 said:

    Re: Alaska

    Quote Originally Posted by scoobz1981
    Sandy from the clinical department sent out an email about a week ago to all clinical students about doing clinical rotations in Alaska... So if anyone is interested (they have amazing heli-skiing there) then I suggest going. I am considering it myself - more so for the skiing... lol... but I am sure the hospitals in Anchorage are good too!


    Val
    P.S. If you want a copy of the email, just PM me
    Say "hi" to Dr. Fleischman for me!
    Saba University School of Medicine, Class of 2009
    Diplomate, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
     
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