Close
Back HOME Menu
Close

VERY VERY hard specific Lung Pathology question q) A 70-year-old man with a 20-year history of “serious” emphysema presents to his physician after he develops the acute onset of fevers, rigors, and a cough productive of green sputum. The symptoms gradually worsen over a DAY and and he presents to the emergency department. He has been taking a beclomethasone inhaler twice daily, an albuterol nebulizer treatment at home four times daily, and has been taking erythromycin for a recent bronchitis. On physical examination he is 183 cm (6 feet) tall and weighs 85 kg. His temperature is 38.3 C (101 F), blood pressure is 170/90 mm Hg, pulse is 95/min, and respirations are 35/min (This IS high). His lung examination reveals diffuse bilateral coarse rhonchi. He uses his sternocleidomastoid muscles with each inspiration. An arterial blood gas reveals a pH of 7.10, a pCO2 of 80 mm Hg, and a pO2 of 50 mm Hg. Over the next 2 hours, he becomes increasingly tachypneic, and his pCO2 rises to 85 mm Hg!! The decision is made to intubate him at that point. Which of the following settings would be most appropriate for his tidal volume on the respirator? 1-500 ml/tidal volume 2-1000 ml/tidal volume 3-No need for a respirator, as he will compensate shortly within the appropriate clinical range and hospital day stay? Choose one, and KNOW EVERYTHING about COPD and asthma. You have got to breathe, right???

QBank Subjects

Subject: Tommy's Concepts

Question

VERY VERY hard specific Lung Pathology question
q) A 70-year-old man with a 20-year history of “serious” emphysema presents to his physician after he develops the acute onset of fevers, rigors, and a cough productive of green sputum. The symptoms gradually worsen over a DAY and and he presents to the emergency department. He has been taking a beclomethasone inhaler twice daily, an albuterol nebulizer treatment at home four times daily, and has been taking erythromycin for a recent bronchitis. On physical examination he is 183 cm (6 feet) tall and weighs 85 kg. His temperature is 38.3 C (101 F), blood pressure is 170/90 mm Hg, pulse is 95/min, and respirations are 35/min (This IS high). His lung examination reveals diffuse bilateral coarse rhonchi. He uses his sternocleidomastoid muscles with each inspiration. An arterial blood gas reveals a pH of 7.10, a pCO2 of 80 mm Hg, and a pO2 of 50 mm Hg. Over the next 2 hours, he becomes increasingly tachypneic, and his pCO2 rises to 85 mm Hg!! The decision is made to intubate him at that point. Which of the following settings would be most appropriate for his tidal volume on the respirator?
1-500 ml/tidal volume
2-1000 ml/tidal volume
3-No need for a respirator, as he will compensate shortly within the appropriate clinical range and hospital day stay?
Choose one, and KNOW EVERYTHING about COPD and asthma. You have got to breathe, right???

Answer

Questions Views
This website is not sponsored or endorsed by the USMLE, NBME or FSMB.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.